A view on Hope; and a pertinent question to randomistas

...What concerns me is that the direct interventions that are targeted towards addressing such psycho-social constraints are not highlighted or even mentioned as they are not neat enough for RCT measurement. Instead the reliance is on the outcome variables and a black box of intervention package which is not very helpful for intervention design. Short … Continue reading A view on Hope; and a pertinent question to randomistas

The I-Told-You-So test for research questions

A few weeks back, Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) (my former employer) posed this question to readers with reference to two small and micro-enterprises (SME) studies in Ghana and Mexico (RCTs, of course) -In the summer issue of SSIR, we will discuss the results of these two studies in more detail. But here, we’d like YOU to predict … Continue reading The I-Told-You-So test for research questions

Insights into female voting behaviour in rural Pakistan

Chris Blattman flags a new World Bank paper by Ghazala Mansuri and Xavier Gine. The authors find that information dissemination (of the nature of pre-election voting awareness camapigns) increased voting among women by about 12% on average. Alongside this enhanced political participation, women also displayed greater degrees of independent decision-making when it came to voting for their chosen … Continue reading Insights into female voting behaviour in rural Pakistan

Thoughts on (and from) yet-unread randomistas’ books

Why I am looking forward to reading these books:More Than Good Intentions and Poor Economics were published last month. By a happy coincidence, I have worked in Ghana and India - two countries that feature prominently in many of the accounts in both the books. Also, these books have stories from field experiments conducted by IPA and CMF (an … Continue reading Thoughts on (and from) yet-unread randomistas’ books

‘Spill-overs’ from long-term studies

Over at the Development Impact blog, Markus writes about the importance of studies that take a long-term viewSome of the more impressive results I have seen have come out of papers which take a long term view. Three examples of this are Esther Duflo’s work on school construction in Indonesia (ungated version here), Hoddinott, et. al’s … Continue reading ‘Spill-overs’ from long-term studies